DeNOTES

City Dreams & American Themes
by Dan DeNicola

TBT Playlist: “Cold”

One from the vault…

NEW VIDEO: M O T H E R’S “EASY”

fox-n-hound:

Here’s the new music video for M O T H E R's debut single “Easy.” The mysterious Brooklyn-based group released this dreamy, danceable track on their Soundcloud earlier this year, and have been gaining momentum ever since.

Their minimal black and white video stars model Karina Trizotti, and was directed by the band themselves. Watch the video above, and stay tuned for more news on M O T H E R, hopefully with an LA show announcement soon.

May Playlist: “mean red”

robertrauschenberg:

Robert Rauschenberg, Global Loft (Spread), 1979. Solvent transfer on fabric and paper collage to wooden panels with acrylic paint, three metal brushes. 
Congratulations to the Huntington on your new acquisition—especially exciting news considering Bob’s personal connection to the institution. Referring to his trip to the Huntington in 1946 while stationed in the Navy at Camp Pendleton, Bob has said: “this was my first encounter with art as art…the first time I realized you could be an artist.”
See the Huntington’s press release for the full story plus a video of curator Jessica Todd Smith discussing the work.

robertrauschenberg:

Robert Rauschenberg, Global Loft (Spread), 1979. Solvent transfer on fabric and paper collage to wooden panels with acrylic paint, three metal brushes. 

Congratulations to the Huntington on your new acquisition—especially exciting news considering Bob’s personal connection to the institution. Referring to his trip to the Huntington in 1946 while stationed in the Navy at Camp Pendleton, Bob has said: “this was my first encounter with art as art…the first time I realized you could be an artist.”

See the Huntington’s press release for the full story plus a video of curator Jessica Todd Smith discussing the work.

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

A secret history of modern foodie culture: “America, Your Food Is So Gay”

It’s no secret that I greatly admire the life and writing of Richard Olney. And the only cookbook I’ve loved and abused more than his “French Menu Cookbook” is my tattered, wine-stained copy of the “New York Times Cookbook” by Craig Claiborne. 

Well, apparently, I’m not alone in my appreciation for these two titans of mid-20th century foodie culture. The astute and compassionate writer John Birdsall has plumbed their backstories, and the life of James Beard, in search of a “gay sensibility” in the art of New American cuisine. His essay should be required reading of cooks and foodies, food writers and their fans, and students of queer history alike!

via itsjohnbirdsall:

I was ten in 1970, a shy kid growing up in a scrub-oak suburb south of San Francisco. Our house was pitched on stilts sunk in a steep hillside, looking out onto a little arroyo and into the house of two men I loved like uncles (and more deeply than some of the uncles whose DNA I shared).

But besides me and my older brother, Walter, my mom, and my dad, everybody on our street despised Pat and Lou. At a time when it was still a crime in California for one man to give another man a blowjob, the neighbors hated them because they shared the same enormous bed, draped in a regal turquoise coverlet. Hated them because Lou stayed home like moms did, trolling Safeway for steaks and stuffed potatoes to fix for Pat when he got home from the office.

(Why didn’t my parents share the general loathing for Pat and Lou, a disgust expressed through passive avoidance, active shunning, and the occasional high-pitched catcall? I discovered later that my mom, bless her, is a total fag hag. And my dad always hated bullies—it trumped his ambivalence about the gay thing.)

Pat and Lou did cocktail hour nightly from a pair of velour bucket chairs, in their beam-ceilinged, ranch-style canyon house overlooking masses of scarlet and purple irises under the oaks. They put on matching poplin jumpsuits and corduroy house moccasins to sip Gibsons, tossing nuts to Kurt, their sleek miniature schnauzer, from fingers studded with big-jeweled cocktail rings. On nights when my parents would go to the Iron Gate restaurant for shrimp scampi and saltimbocca, they dropped us boys off at Pat and Lou’s for babysitting.

On those nights, Lou would cook us crazy shit our mom never fixed, food so rich no adult should ever serve it to a ten-year-old. There were casseroles that used Monterey Jack as a suspension medium for olives, ground veal, and button mushrooms from a can. And there were Lou’s famous burgers, so rich and salty, so crusted with a mixture of caramelized onions, Roquefort crumbles, and Grey Poupon—a thick impasto gilded beneath the electric broiler element—I could only ever eat half before feeling sick. I loved every bite.

Looking back, I recognize in Lou’s burgers my first taste of food that didn’t give a fuck about nutrition or the drab strictures of home economics. They were calibrated for adult pleasure, acutely expressive of a formalized richness— exactly the type of thing James Beard taught Americans to eat (for all I know, Lou’s recipe was straight out of Beard). I see them now, those burgers, as unflinchingly, unapologetically, magnificently queer.

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Continuing Marina Abramovic / performance art day, here.

carlosbaila:

Marina Abramovic meets Ulay

7 Steps to Better Appreciate Lady Gaga’s “Do What U Want”

1.) Listen to the Mother Monster’s new track (featuring R. Kelly), "Do What U Want"

2.) Remember that weird video collaboration between Gaga and legendary performance artist Marina Abramović to raise awareness of the “Abramović Method.” You know, the one with the nude crystal-hugging.

3.) Consequently contemplate the influence of Abramović and her work on Lady Gaga’s artistic sensibility. Don’t spend too long on this step, it’s kind of obvious.

4.) Watch Marina Abramović discuss her seminal performance art piece “Rhythm 0” in the video above, and read the description below (from her Wikipedia page):

Rhythm 0, 1974[edit]

To test the limits of the relationship between performer and audience, Abramović developed one of her most challenging (and best-known) performances. She assigned a passive role to herself, with the public being the force which would act on her. Abramović placed on a table 72 objects that people were allowed to use (a sign informed them) in any way that they chose. Some of these were objects that could give pleasure, while others could be wielded to inflict pain, or to harm her. Among them were a rose, a feather, honey, a whip, scissors, a scalpel, a gun and a single bullet. For six hours the artist allowed the audience members to manipulate her body and actions.

Initially, members of the audience reacted with caution and modesty, but as time passed (and the artist remained passive) people began to act more aggressively. As Abramović described it later: “What I learned was that… if you leave it up to the audience, they can kill you.” … “I felt really violated: they cut up my clothes, stuck rose thorns in my stomach, one person aimed the gun at my head, and another took it away. It created an aggressive atmosphere. After exactly 6 hours, as planned, I stood up and started walking toward the audience. Everyone ran away, to escape an actual confrontation.”[6]

5.) Be devastated because humans suck. Be humbled because art can reveal this. 

6.) Repeat Step #1, and realize that Lady Gaga has actually packaged a layered, challenging critique of the artist/audience relationship in an innocuous sex-jam trifle. (And is that why she got R. Kelly to be on it? I mean as opposed to Drake or The Weeknd or Usher or Frank Ocean or basically ANY R&B SINGER MORE RELEVANT? Was she trying to make the ultimate sex-jam to end all sex-jams?! Alright, probably not. Maybe she just liked “Space Jam” when she was 10.

7.) Be blown away. Or not. Haters gonna hate.

-D

Celebrating the new blog theme/redesign with a little fridge envy…

via thepenguinpress

(via bookshelfporn)

bookshelfporn:

The NoMad Hotel, NYC

I mean, can I just live in this room? 

bookshelfporn:

The NoMad Hotel, NYC

I mean, can I just live in this room? 

(Source: jy1310)

laphamsquarterly:

"And had you watched Ahab’s face that night, you would have thought that in him also two different things were warring. While his one live leg made lively echoes along the deck, every stroke of his dead limb sounded like a coffin tap. On life and death this old man walked. But though the ship so swiftly sped, and though from every eye, like arrows, the eager glances shot, yet the silvery jet was no more seen that night. Every sailor swore he saw it once, but not a second time"
Know your nemesis.

laphamsquarterly:

"And had you watched Ahab’s face that night, you would have thought that in him also two different things were warring. While his one live leg made lively echoes along the deck, every stroke of his dead limb sounded like a coffin tap. On life and death this old man walked. But though the ship so swiftly sped, and though from every eye, like arrows, the eager glances shot, yet the silvery jet was no more seen that night. Every sailor swore he saw it once, but not a second time"

Know your nemesis.

Feels like #Strangelove

nativefunkk:

Sky Garden by Robert Rauschenberg, 1969

Feels like #Strangelove

nativefunkk:

Sky Garden by Robert Rauschenberg, 1969

(via streetetiquette)

willow-wood:

The Moulin Rouge ~ Eugène Galien-Laloue 1906

willow-wood:

The Moulin Rouge ~ Eugène Galien-Laloue 1906

(via theportablefaulkner)